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FAQs

  • What is a Master Plan and why does Cal Poly need one?

The Master Plan determines the physical campus needs for the next 20 years, guiding the general location, size and types of land uses, facilities, and circulation systems necessary to support Cal Poly’s mission and enrollment now and in the future.  The Master Plan is guided by the academic and enrollment plan, which is informed by Vision 2022.  A Master Plan update is necessary, as the university has completed most of the projects detailed in its 2001 Master Plan.  The Master Plan update is also required by the California State University (CSU) system to guide future capital projects and the process is expected to take two years.

  • What are the ultimate goals of the Master Plan?

The Master Plan ultimately determines the physical campus needs for the next 20 years, guiding the general location, size and types of land uses, facilities and circulation systems necessary to support Cal Poly’s mission and enrollment now and in the future.  The specific Master Plan objectives and initiatives will be drafted as part of the two-year Master Plan update planning process.

  • How many years does the Master Plan update account for?

A Master Plan typically accounts for 15 to 25 years. The Master Plan update Cal Poly is beginning to work on will cover approximately 20 years.

  • What is the approval process for the Master Plan?

The Master Plan is developed by professional staff with widespread input from members of the campus and community.  It then is reviewed internally before being presented to the CSU Board of Trustees for final approval.

  • How is the Master Plan different from the city’s general plan?

The two are similar in concept and development, but differ in important ways.  A city or county’s general plan is prepared for the entire jurisdiction and its minimum content is specified by state law, while a university master plan covers the university’s lands, following guidelines from the CSU system and has a different approval process.  Another important distinction is the fact that city or counties generally own a very small portion of the land in their jurisdiction and use their regulatory authority to manage their plan through zoning and building codes.  In contrast, a university manages all of its land, so it administers the plan through capital investment and construction decisions.

  • Why are you soliciting feedback from stakeholders?

The thoughts, ideas and input of all stakeholders are important to the Master Plan process.  It helps ensure the Master Plan balances the advancement of the university’s mission with the thoughts, ideas and concerns of the campus and community.

  • What are you going to do with the input you receive?

The professional working team responsible for drafting the technical aspects of the plan will consider all input received from advisory committees, which are comprised of a cross section of stakeholders.  The ideas and thoughts from members of the campus and broader community will also be collected during public workshops and forums as part of the Master Plan update process.  Since it is likely that different stakeholders will offer varying suggestions, the university will balance the input it receives within the context of the university’s mission and planning best practices.

  • When will the Master Plan update be complete?

The process, from the early stages we are currently in through final approval by the CSU Board of Trustees, is expected to take two years.